Author Archives: Ralf Herrmann

Interactive Cloud OS 15.10 released

Interactive Cloud OS 15.10 gives you a one node OpenStack Juno installation ready to run in less than 10 minutes. This includes booting from CD-ROM, formatting the hard disk, installing the Linux OS and configuring OpenStack.

This is a maintenance release to update the packages of the previous release 15.3 to latest kernel and security patches and to fix this nasty bug causing the mysql service not to start if setting the required init-connect in its configuration file.

If you’re already running 15.3 or 14.11 you do not need to reinstall 15.10. Just do a zypper up by yourself and apply the hotfix for the mysql service.

Please recommended us:

Interactive Cloud OS fails to start after zypper update

If you’re doing linux system updates for Interactive Cloud OS 15.3 and 14.11 (as it is recommended) with zypper up, after September, 26th OpenStack fails to start.

To fix this, we’ve provided a small hotfix to patch the mysql service. To install the hotfix, just login on your Interactive Cloud OS node via console or ssh and run the next two commands:

curl http://ftp.internet.de/pub/cloudos/cloudos-15.3-hotfix-after-mariadb-update.sh > hotfix.sh
/bin/bash hotfix.sh

Thanks to Steve for reporting this. Continue reading

Please recommended us:

Interactive Cloud OS 15.3 released

Interactive Cloud OS 15.3 gives you a one node OpenStack Juno installation ready to run in less than 10 minutes. This includes booting from CD-ROM, formatting the hard disk, installing the Linux OS and configuring OpenStack.

This is a maintenance release to update the packages of the previous release 14.11 to latest kernel and security patches.

Note: You do not need to reinstall 15.3 if you’re already running 14.11. Just do a zypper up by yourself.

Please recommended us:

Interactive Cloud OS 14.11 released

Interactive Cloud OS 14.11 gives you a one node OpenStack Juno installation ready to run in less than 10 minutes. This includes booting from CD-ROM, formatting the hard disk, installing the Linux OS and configuring OpenStack Icehouse.

It’s a feature update which brings OpenStack to the new Juno release providing the same services as previous releases with OpenStack Icehouse.

  • New Feature: OpenStack Juno (replaces OpenStack Icehouse).
  • Updated to latest kernel and security patches.

Please note that creating an instance in the dashboard may yield an error pop up about an invalid service catalog: volume. This does not hamper your instances and should be fixed in the next release.

 

 

Please recommended us:

Interactive Cloud OS 14.10.1 released

Interactive Cloud OS 14.10.1 is a maintenance release for 14.10 which fixes a couple of bugs in the installation and updates the software to the latest patches.

  • Fixed: Installation on some raid controllers (i.e. on ML 370 G5 or DL 380 G4) failed. Thanks to Mark Lants for reporting this.
  • Fixed: Installation failed on disks with more than 2 TB size.
  • Fixed: Checking for cpu virtualisation support failed if feature is not available.
  • New Feature: The apache server configuration disables SSLv3 to avoid the poodle attack.
  • Updated to latest kernel and security patches.

Interactive Cloud OS 14.10.1 gives you a one node OpenStack Icehouse installation ready to run in less than 10 minutes. With the new simple installation mode it is even possible to finish the installation in 5 minutes only. This includes booting from CD-ROM, formatting the hard disk, installing the Linux OS and configuring OpenStack Icehouse.

Please recommended us:

Interactive Cloud OS 14.10 released

The new release of Interactive Cloud OS 14.10 gives you an even easier and quicker installation for a one node OpenStack Icehouse Installation than ever before.

With the new simple installation mode, the whole installation can be done in 5 Minutes only. This includes formatting the hard disk, installing the Linux OS and configuring OpenStack Icehouse.

  • New Feature: Simple install mode with predefined network settings and DHCP:
    1. Boot your server from ISO Image of Interactive Cloud OS 14.10.
    2. Choose simple installation mode.
    3. Choose hard disk for installation.
    4. Enable DHCP on your notebook and plug it to the first NIC of your server.
    5. Point your browser to https://console.cloudos. Enjoy.
  • Previous expert install mode still available for easy customisation of network settings.
  • Updated to latest security patches, including fixes for Shellshock.

Update 2014-10-23: The password in simple installation mode is cloudos! So to login to the dashboard point your browser to https://console.cloudos and login with admin  and cloudos.

Please recommended us:

Interactive Cloud OS 14.9 released

Interactive Cloud OS 14.9 has been released today. It’s a maintenance release giving your virtual machines a performance boost compared against any release since 14.5. It’s also including the latest security patches for kernel, apache and the base packages. Last but not least it fixes the »Unknown localized field« error messages with debian 7 net install.

For the next release in October we aim at adding a secondary install mode with predefined network settings, dhcp and dns server for an even easier and faster installation in a testbed. And maybe to upgrade to OpenStack Juno.

Interactive Cloud OS 14.9 gives you a one node OpenStack Icehouse installation ready to run in less than 10 minutes.

Please recommended us:

Interactive Cloud OS 14.8.1 released

The new release 14.8.1 of Interactive Cloud OS is ready for download. It’s a maintenance release fixing a couple of bugs with sophisticated passwords for the OpenStack dashboard and the linux system as well.

Interactive Cloud OS 14.8.1 gives you a one node OpenStack Icehouse installation ready to run in less than 10 minutes.

Please recommended us:

Interactive Cloud OS 14.8 released

The new release 14.8 of Interactive Cloud OS is ready for download. It gives you a one node OpenStack Icehouse installation ready to run in less than 10 minutes.

This is a maintenance release fixing a couple of bugs introduced in 14.7 but adding new features too:

  • Fixes a serious bug not properly deploying routers to external network.
  • Fixes a serious bug not allowing console access to instances.
  • New feature: supports booting from usb stick.
  • New feature: enables ssl for dashboard web access.
  • New feature: no reboot required after installation.

Update 2014-08-15: There’s a nasty bug in 14.8 always setting the password for OpenStack dashboard users to cloudos regardless of what you entered during installation.

Please recommended us:

Secure Public Cloud Setup? An idea…

Running a virtual machine on any public cloud has an inherent security risk: The cloud service provider.

The cloud service provider may take a snapshot of the virtual machine at any time. Thus allowing him access onto any data available at the moment of the snapshot, even onto encrypted data. Or to suspend the virtual machine to maliciously inject a root kit into the virtual machines memory, no matter if it’s running Windows or Linux or any other Operating System.

Call me paranoid. But besides those sophisticated attack scenarios there are much simpler ones, like just peeking the virtual disk. Anyhow, this allows data privacy violation as well as industrial espionage by a cloud service provider, regardless if he acts on his own or is forced by court or an intelligence service.

And do not forget, that the Washington Post has shown that the U.S. intelligence runs a program called PRISM to secretly mine data from U.S. internet companies.

So it may be of some interest for the internet community to create a secure public cloud setup (SPC — let’s call it spice) with Interactive Cloud OS –or any other Linux– which is not vulnerable to unrestricted and unnoticed access to private data.

But how could a user protect his data or virtual machines in a public cloud? Some requirements come to mind:

  • Any access on a virtual machine or its disks will be logged and shown to the user.
  • Any user should be able to check at any time that the running OS hasn’t been altered.
  • The running OS should be open source, thus allowing the community to check for back doors.

At a first glance it looks impossible to achieve the requirements.

But, on the other hand, Interactive Network already developed award winning system Intermediär with similar requirements which is used to ensure high grade data privacy for the German Haemophilia Register. Using a combination of digital signatures, cryptographic functions and organisational conditions Intermediär is protected against any unnoticed alteration or eavesdropping, including hardware based attacks, like key loggers.

After all it ought to be possible to achieve the requirements.

But even if there is a chance to fail, creating an open source process to SPiCe up the cloud would be worth the effort, wouldn’t it?

Feel free to join the discussion.

Please recommended us: